The Best Traditional Dishes Cooked in a Mexican Kitchen

The Best Traditional Dishes Cooked in a Mexican Kitchen

Mexican cooking out stands others with their variety of intense and vibrant flavors from fresh produce, bright vegetables, and bold herbs and spices.

Get the real deal of Mexican flavor from the best traditional eats that are cooked in a Mexican kitchen.  From the most popular Mexican ingredients including beans, rice, avocado, and limes to the sometimes sweet and sometimes spicy mix, Mexican food will always surely hit the spot of your cravings.

    Enmolada

An enmolada is a rolled corn tortilla that’s often filled with shredded chicken and cotija cheese, then bathed in black mole and sprinkled with sesame seeds and crumbled cheese.

Think of it as an enchilada taken to the next level with mole sauce—the one ingredient that takes this dish with a new name and flavor.  You’re in for a treat with the mole, which is mainly from Oaxaca and Puebla, a delicately sweet, spicy, and of the most complex sauces you will ever try.

Posole

The Aztecs believed that maize was a sacred plant, which explains why this delightful Mexican dish is traditionally prepared in a Mexican kitchen and reserved for special occasions.

The foundation of this hearty soup is hominy, hulled corn kernels, simmered with red chiles, aromatic spices, tomatoes, and pork shoulder.  It is then garnished with shredded cabbage, chopped onions, sliced radishes, and lime.  Enjoy this dish alongside warm corn tortillas.

Tortas

Imagine a sandwich that’s typically served hot, grilled or pressed, but can be enjoyed cold as well. Its mouth-watering fillings of meat and veggies are rolled into two of Mexico’s most iconic pieces of bread, bolillo or telera. 

 Chile de Arbol Salsa

This sauce may not be a dish itself but it is arguably more important than any meal cooked in a Mexican kitchen.  Mexican foods are literally hit with this sauce everywhere in Mexico.  

If made from scratch, it is easy to prepare with only about five ingredients and is a much more approachable sauce for people that can’t tolerate too much spice.

Chiltomate

Salsa is often referred to as the core of Mexican cooking.  Another delectable sauce that is considered one of the world’s oldest tomato sauces, Chiltomate is a cooked tomato and habanero salsa.  Used traditionally with grilled meats, you can enjoy this with any Mexican food.  It is dead simple to prepare, too with only 5 ingredients in about 10 minutes.

Tacos de Papa

These are mashed cumin-spiced potatoes that are stuffed into a corn tortilla and fried until crispy.  You will see them garnished with different ingredients, depending on which Mexican kitchen they are made and served from.  You can expect crumbled queso fresco, shredded cabbage, salsa verde, sour cream, and pico de gallo.

Chiles en Nogada

You will expect this Mexican food traditionally made in September, in celebration of Mexican Independence Day but some Mexican kitchens in the U.S. offer it year-round.  It is a favorite because of the poblanos that are stuffed with picadillo, a mixture of pork, chopped fruit, and spices, then smothered with a walnut cream sauce and sprinkled generously with pomegranate seeds for a traditional kick.

Sopa de Lima

A traditional Mexican soup, hailing from Yucatan, it’s a bowl of comfort made with chicken, corn tortillas, avocados, habaneros, and lime.

Bocoles Huastecos

Bocoles are corn cakes made from masa (corn dough) and a little lard then grilled on a comal(griddle), so they are arguably healthier.  This is a light snack that you can eat with any condiment you prefer.  They are one of the humble meals made in a Mexican kitchen that you can eat for breakfast, lunch, or dinner with your choice of topping—shredded pork or chicken and grilled mushrooms, or plain cheese.

Elotes

Think of grilled corn on the cob, slathered with mayo, chili powder, lime, cilantro, and Cotija cheese.  Elotes is a beloved street food because of all the sorts of savory add-ons that take a relatively boring corn on the cob to another level.  Well-charred corn from a grill or charring on a skillet on med-high is the perfect vehicle for savory Cotija cheese or sub crumbled Feta, whichever you like.

A Flavor Profile for Everybody from a Mexican Kitchen

Work up your appetite with Mexican food that is unique with its diverse taste of sweet, spicy, rich, or acidic from fresh vegetables, meats, herbs, and spices.  There is definitely an infinite number of ways to love Mexican food prepared in any Mexican kitchen near you.